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Census Research Guide

A guide to understanding and locating data produced by the U.S. Census Bureau

2020 Census

2020 Apportionment Results


Apportionment is the process of dividing the 435 memberships, or seats, in the U.S. House of Representatives among the 50 states. At the conclusion of each decennial census, the results are used to calculate the number of seats to which each state is entitled. Each of the 50 states is entitled to a minimum of one seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Table 1. Apportionment Population and Number of Representatives by State: 2020 Census
 

Table 2. Resident Population for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: 2020 Census
 

Table 3. Overseas Population for the 50 States and the District of Columbia: 2020 Census

 

Additional Data

Table A. Apportionment Population, Resident Population, and Overseas Population: 2020 Census and 2010 Census

Table B1. Top Ten Runner-Up States to Almost Gain Another Congressional Seat: 2020 Census
AND   Table B2. Additional Apportionment Population Needed for First Runner-Up State to Gain Another Congressional Seat: 1940 to 2020

Table C1. Number of Seats in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 1910 to 2020

Table C2. Apportionment Population and Number of Seats in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 1910 to 2020

Table D1. Number of Seats Gained and Lost in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 2020 Census  AND   Table D2. Number of Seats Gained and Lost in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 2010 Census

Table E. Numeric and Percent Change in Resident Population of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: 2020 Census and 2010 Census

Number of U.S. Military Personnel, Federal Civilian Personnel, and their Dependents in the Overseas Population for the 50 States and the District of Columbia: 2020 Census

Priority Values for 2020 Census Apportionment

The 2020 United States Census, which counts every person in the United States and five U.S. territories, concluded on October 15, 2020

The goal of the United States Census is to count every person only once and in the right place.

Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution mandates that a population and housing count occur every 10 years.  The results determine how many seats in Congress each state receives. The Census also provides critical data that lawmakers, businesses, educators, and many others use to provide daily services, products, and support for individuals and their communities.

 

The 2020 Census: Frequently Asked Questions

2020 Apportionment Results


Apportionment is the process of dividing the 435 memberships, or seats, in the U.S. House of Representatives among the 50 states. At the conclusion of each decennial census, the results are used to calculate the number of seats to which each state is entitled. Each of the 50 states is entitled to a minimum of one seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Table 1. Apportionment Population and Number of Representatives by State: 2020 Census
 

Table 2. Resident Population for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: 2020 Census
 

Table 3. Overseas Population for the 50 States and the District of Columbia: 2020 Census

 

Additional Data

Table A. Apportionment Population, Resident Population, and Overseas Population: 2020 Census and 2010 Census

Table B1. Top Ten Runner-Up States to Almost Gain Another Congressional Seat: 2020 Census
AND   Table B2. Additional Apportionment Population Needed for First Runner-Up State to Gain Another Congressional Seat: 1940 to 2020

Table C1. Number of Seats in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 1910 to 2020

Table C2. Apportionment Population and Number of Seats in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 1910 to 2020

Table D1. Number of Seats Gained and Lost in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 2020 Census  AND   Table D2. Number of Seats Gained and Lost in U.S. House of Representatives by State: 2010 Census

Table E. Numeric and Percent Change in Resident Population of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: 2020 Census and 2010 Census

Number of U.S. Military Personnel, Federal Civilian Personnel, and their Dependents in the Overseas Population for the 50 States and the District of Columbia: 2020 Census

Priority Values for 2020 Census Apportionment

 

The latest information about the 2020 Census can be found on the 2020 Census Results website https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade/2020/2020-census-results.html

 

 

2020 Redistricting Census Program

The Census Redistricting Data Program 

Required by law, the Redistricting Data Program provides states the opportunity to specify the small geographic areas for which they wish to receive decennial population totals for the purpose of reapportionment and redistricting.

Under the provisions of Title 13, Section 141(c) of the United States Code (U.S.C.), the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) is required to provide the ‘‘officers or public bodies having initial responsibility for the legislative apportionment or districting of each state ...’’ with the opportunity to specify geographic areas (e.g., blocks, voting districts) for which they wish to receive decennial census population counts for the purpose of reapportionment or redistricting. By April 1 of the year following the decennial census, the Secretary is required to furnish the state officials or their designees with population counts for American Indian areas, counties, cities, census blocks, and state-specified congressional, legislative, and voting districts.

2020 Census: New Jersey

2020 Census Guides & Tutorials

Census Maps

Disclosure Avoidance and the 2020 Census

Disclosure Avoidance and the 2020 Census

The 2020 Census will use a powerful new privacy protection system known in scientific circles as “differential privacy,” designed specifically for the digital age. The Census Bureau is transitioning to this new, privacy protection system to keep pace with emerging threats in today’s digital world.

Census FAQ:

Why is the U.S. Census Bureau moving to a new privacy protection system?

A new disclosure avoidance system (DAS) is needed to defend against new threats posed by today’s technology: growing computing power, advances in mathematics, and easy access to large, public databases. Combined, these changes could allow highly sophisticated users to identify common data points between our published statistics, or between our statistics and outside databases. They could use these common threads to potentially identify the people or businesses behind the statistics. Our research shows that the risk of successful re-identifications is unacceptably large. We are committed to applying better and stronger protections with each advance in data science.

To learn more, please see: Protecting the Confidentiality of America’s Statistics: Adopting Modern Disclosure Avoidance Methods at the Census Bureau and Ensuring Confidentiality and Fitness-for-Use.

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